A Drummer's Testament
drummers
<Home page>
 
Chapter III-3:  The Work of Guinea Corn and Other Crops   <PDF file>

Staple foods:  uses of guinea corn (sorghum), millet, corn, beans; pito (local beer); ritual use, drinking habits

Paragraph outline and links
Proverbs and sayings
Dagbani words and other search terms
 
Supplementary material

[images]


Contents outline and links by paragraph  <top of page>

Introduction

1.  guinea corn’s importance compared to yams

The work of guinea corn:  saɣim

2.  how to prepare saɣim with guinea corn flour
3.  serving the saɣim into bowls
4.  how to prepare the soup or stew with okro, fish, and seasonings
5.  how they serve the household

Other work of guinea corn

6.  kpaakulo:  fried fermented flour paste; can also use corn, beans, millet
7.  kpaakulo from Ashantis; formerly called chabala
8.  porridge
9.  making kpɛya by malting
10.  porridge with teeth
11.  boiled guinea corn for morning food

Maha

12.  maha for Muslim alms
13.  how to prepare maha
14.  alms for funerals or for Fridays
15.  alms for other reasons, advised by maalam or soothsayer

Pito

16.  used to brew pito; women brew it
17.  use ground kpɛya to brew it; send to other parts of Ghana
18.  boiled kpeya in big pots; takes three days to brew pito
19.  sieve the boiled kpɛya and ferment it to become pito

The pito house

20.  pito is for people who drink it and sell it
21.  receive pito to taste; then buy and drink from calabashes

Drunkards

22.  the behavior of drunkards
23.  drinking leads to insults and quarrels
24.  some drunkards don’t want trouble; how they walk zigzag
25.  some drunkards go from house to house for pito to taste
26.  how villagers drink on market days; the behavior of drunkards
27.  Tolon has many drinkers
28.  villagers are the ones who drink more; meet and bluff their friends at pito house
29.  how they bluff one another their children and their farming for food

Pito at funerals

30.  villagers also attend funerals to get pito
31.  how the elder of the funeral organizes the preparation of pito
32.  how pito is served at the funeral house; very important for funerals

Millet pito

33.  millet is used for sacrifice to Tilo house shrine
34.  Tilo pito is brewed from millet
35.  millet pito is not consumed much apart from repairing Tilo

Pito in Dagbon and elsewhere

36.  guinea corn is the main pito; if no guinea corn, can use corn but few will drink it
37.  more pito cooking in Dagbon because more farming of guinea corn

Millet

38.  millet for saɣim and kpaakulo
39.  how fula is prepared and eaten; not only Dagbamba food
40.  can use rice for fula, but not as good as millet; adding sweet potatoes
41.  Dagbamba probably got fula from the Hausas; important for Muslims and Hausas
42.  how yama and yaaŋkanda are prepared for farmers

Corn

43.  for saɣim and porridge and porridge with teeth; roasted; secondary to guinea corn

Beans

44.  after yams, guinea corn, millet; bambara beans, cowpeas, other beans
45.  stored in large containers; important food when yams not yet harvested or have no yams
46.  how to prepare gabli; grind beans and boil
47.  tubaani; beans ground and wrapped in leaves and boiled
48.  kooshe; prepared the same as kpaakulo; also just cook beans; also sell them

Conclusion

49.  transition to the talk about rice


Proverbs and Sayings  <top of page>

She is going to clean the soup.

“We are brewing pito today.”

“Today we are going to finish boiling the pito.”

“The drink has cried.”

You cannot drink pito and be satisfied.

“My in-law, you should get dalama.”

When someone drinks and insults you, it is that he already wants to insult you; and the one who drinks and quarrels, as for him, he already wanted quarrels.

He will get up and be going to his house.  And there will be about ten roads to his house.

“This is the funeral money I am greeting you with.”

All of the different types of pito, we call them pito. There is strength and strength in all, and they are different.


Key words for ASCII searches  <top of page>

Guinea corn terms
chabala
kadugra  (kaduɣra)
koko
kpaakulo
kpeya kukogli  (kpɛya kukɔɣli)
kukogli  (kukɔɣli)
kukognyina  (kukɔɣnyina)
maha
mahalaa
massa
sagdugu kukogli  (saɣduɣu kukɔɣli)
sagim  (saɣim)
tuwon zafi
T-Zed

Pito terms
dabisi
dakahili
dalama
dalohili  (dalɔhili)
kpeya  (kpɛya)
pito
tee

Other foods
fula
adua
bambara beans
cowpeas
fufu
gabli
kanaafiri
kenkey
kooshe
kpalgu
naanzunyuunga  (naanzunyuuŋa)
plaintain
tuubaani
yaankanda  (yaaŋkanda)
yama
yona

Miscellaneous terms
cedi, cedis
cherga  (chɛrga)
coalpot
Jebuni  (Jɛbuni)
kalnli
kambong  (kambɔŋ)
kunchung  (kunchuŋ)
laa
lokorgu  (lɔkɔrgu)
maalam
neli  (nɛli)
pesewa, pesewas
pong  (pɔŋ)
sagbenyuhirgu  (saɣbɛnyuhirgu)
sagvugli  (saɣvuɣli)
tankoro  (taŋkoro)
Tilo
wari

Towns and places
Bawku
Bolgatanga
Dagbon
Kumasi
Nandom
Navrongo
Paga
Pusiga
Takoradi
Tolon
Tumu
Wa

Cultural groups
Ashantis
Dagbana, Dagbamba
Frafras
Konkomba
Mossis